Spinal Cord Stimulation in Rochdale, NY

Discover Spinal Cord Stimulation in Rochdale, NY-A Leading Solution for Chronic Pain Relief. This innovative approach, provided by NY Spine Medicine, addresses severe back pain and enhances quality of life. Perfect for those seeking effective and long-lasting solutions.

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Understanding Spinal Cord Stimulation: A Revolutionary Pain Management Technique in Rochdale, NY

What is Spinal Cord Stimulation?

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a cutting-edge therapy used to alleviate chronic pain. It involves a device that sends low levels of electrical stimulation to the spinal cord to interrupt pain signals to the brain. This method is particularly beneficial for patients who have not found relief from other treatments.

Ideal for residents of Queens seeking back pain relief, this procedure is minimally invasive and can be tailored to each individual’s needs, making it a preferred choice in Rochdale, NY.

Expertise in Pain Relief

At NY Spine Medicine, our team specializes in advanced pain management techniques, offering tailored solutions for each patient.

Trusted by Queens

Countless patients have entrusted their pain management to us, citing exceptional care and outcomes.

State-of-the-Art Facilities

We provide the latest in medical technology and treatments, ensuring high standards of care for all.

Benefits of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Queens

Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS) has transformed the way chronic pain is managed in Rochdale, NY. This therapy, offered at NY Spine Medicine, primarily targets pain by delivering mild electrical pulses directly to the spinal cord, which effectively masks pain signals before they reach the brain. This approach is particularly beneficial for individuals who have not responded well to other types of pain management strategies.

The advantages of SCS extend beyond pain relief. Patients often experience a significant improvement in their overall quality of life. They find themselves able to return to daily activities and hobbies that were previously hindered by pain. Furthermore, SCS often leads to a decreased reliance on pharmaceutical pain relievers, which can have undesirable side effects and long-term health implications.

For those living in Queens, choosing SCS means opting for a life with less pain and more possibilities. Our clinic in Rochdale, NY, offers a compassionate and thorough approach to pain management, ensuring that each patient’s treatment plan is tailored to their specific needs. By reducing pain, SCS helps patients lead more active and fulfilling lives.

The Process of Getting Spinal Cord Stimulation

The journey to receiving spinal cord stimulation at NY Spine Medicine begins with a detailed assessment. Our experienced specialists in Rochdale, NY conduct a thorough review of your medical history and a physical examination to ensure SCS is the right choice for you. This initial consultation is crucial in understanding your pain levels, the causes of your pain, and previous treatments you have undergone.

If you are considered a good candidate for SCS, the next step involves a trial stimulation. This is a temporary setup where a small device is used to simulate the effects of the full treatment, allowing both the doctor and the patient to assess its effectiveness in pain management. The trial period typically lasts about a week, providing ample time to evaluate the impact on your pain without making a long-term commitment.

Should the trial prove successful, a permanent SCS device is then implanted. This procedure is performed under the guidance of our skilled medical team, using state-of-the-art techniques to ensure safety and efficacy. After the implantation, our support continues with follow-up care to monitor your progress and make any necessary adjustments. Our goal is to provide lasting pain relief that improves your quality of life in Queens.

Have a question?

Rochdale Village was named after the English town of Rochdale, Greater Manchester, where the Rochdale Pioneers developed the Rochdale Principles of cooperation. The architect’s concept of Rochdale Village was an attractive community covering 122 blocks that would provide the residents with a park-like setting and facilities of suburbia, within the limits of the Urban Jamaica Area. Rochdale Village was designed to be a “city within a city” when it was planned beginning in 1939, in order to boost tourism to the surrounding area also including Springfield Gardens, Rosedale, and Laurelton.

The property is the former site of Jamaica Race Course, which was the area’s only tourist site and was operated by the Metropolitan Jockey Club and its successor, the Greater New York Association (now the New York Racing Association.) When the NYRA decided to renovate Greater Jamaica’s other track, Aqueduct Racetrack (in South Ozone Park), it also decided to close Jamaica Race Course when the Aqueduct Racetrack’s improvements were finished. Jamaica Race Course was shut down in 1959 and demolished. Rochdale Village was developed under the Mitchell-Lama Housing Program to provide affordable housing for low- and middle-income families. The architect, Herman Jessor, was inspired by the Le Corbusier model. Construction soon proceeded at a rapid pace on the new community in Queens. When Rochdale Village opened, it was the largest private cooperative housing complex in the world until Co-op City in the Bronx was completed in 1971.

Rochdale Village was originally between 10 and 20 percent African American and 80 to 90 percent white. This caused controversy before the start of construction, as black people could not participate in Rochdale Village’s construction. The Rochdale Village complex was supposed to be the model for mixed-race housing in the U.S., but then became symbolic of the Civil Rights Movement, which was ongoing during the complex’s construction; for instance, twenty-three protesters were detained for disrupting the construction in 1961, including William Booth, the future head of mayor John V. Lindsay’s Human Rights Commission. About 10% of the units were given to blacks upon the complex’s 1963 completion. As the years passed, more and more African Americans moved to Rochdale. It was between the late 1960s and mid-1970s that most white people moved from the community, owing to the white flight brought on by white perceptions of black people as dangerous, fears of lowered property value, and racist real estate practices such a block-busting. Soon, the complex became poorer and unable to provide for some basic utilities throughout the early 1980s, with many apartments remaining empty.

Learn more about Rochdale.
Call 212-750-1155 for SCS Consultation Today!